Poorest Neighborhoods in Tulsa County

Discover the 5 Poorest Neighborhoods in Tulsa County, Oklahoma

Tulsa County, the second most populous county in Oklahoma, had an estimated population of 677,358 in 2022. However, not all of its inhabitants experience the same degree of prosperity and well-being.

As per the U.S. Census Bureau, the poverty rate in Tulsa County stood at 14.9% in 2021, surpassing both the state average of 15.6% and the national average of 12.8%.

So, which neighborhoods within Tulsa County face the highest levels of poverty? According to data from City-Data.com, here are the five least affluent neighborhoods in Tulsa County, ordered by the percentage of residents living below the poverty line in 2021:

North Lewis Place

Situated in the north-central region of Tulsa, this neighborhood exhibited a poverty rate of 51.7%, surpassing the county average by more than threefold.

The median annual income for households was $23,750, with the median home value resting at $64,800. The predominant racial demographics were Black or African American (66.4%), followed by White (24.4%), and Hispanic or Latino (6.8%).

This locality bears the name of Lewis Place, a thoroughfare traversing through it. It falls within the 74110 ZIP code zone, inhabited by approximately 18,581 individuals, with a median age of 32.4 years.

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Crutchfield

This district, situated in the northeastern part of Tulsa, had a poverty rate of 49.8%, which was more than three times higher than the county’s average.

It was named after William Crutchfield, a prominent businessman and civic leader who possessed numerous properties in the vicinity. The population here was 10,027 individuals, with a median age of 31.9 years.

The median annual household income was $25,833, and the typical home value stood at $54,200. The majority of the populace identified as Black or African American (73.9%), followed by White (17.5%) and Hispanic or Latino (5.7%).

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Brady Heights

Located in the northwest part of Tulsa, this neighborhood has a poverty rate of 48.9%, which is slightly lower than the preceding two neighborhoods but still significantly higher than the county average.

Named after Tate Brady, a prosperous entrepreneur and politician who played a pivotal role in Tulsa’s founding, this neighborhood is home to a population of 4,597 people with a median age of 36.8 years.

The median household income stands at $26,250, while the median home value is $76,300. The majority of residents identify as Black or African American (60.8%), followed by White (28.7%) and Hispanic or Latino (7.3%).

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Kendall-Whittier

Situated in the eastern-central region of Tulsa, this neighborhood experienced a poverty rate of 46%, which surpassed the county’s average by more than double.

The neighborhood received its name from two educational institutions within its vicinity: Kendall College (now known as the University of Tulsa) and Whittier Elementary School. It boasts a population of 17,466 individuals with a median age of 29.9 years.

The median household income stood at $29,167, and the typical home value was $77,800. The demographic breakdown reveals that the majority of its residents were of Hispanic or Latino origin (51%), followed by those of White descent (32%) and Black or African American heritage (11%).

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Owen Park

This community, situated in the western-central part of Tulsa, had a poverty rate of 44%, which, while slightly lower than the preceding neighborhood, remained considerably high when compared to the county’s average.

It was named after Charles Page Owen, a real estate developer who generously donated land for a public park within the vicinity. The neighborhood had a population of 18,192 individuals with a median age of 33.6 years.

The median household income stood at $30,625, and the median home value was $82,900. The majority of its residents were White (67%), with Hispanic or Latino individuals accounting for 18%, and Black or African American individuals making up 10% of the population.

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Final Words

These five neighborhoods embody some of the most underprivileged areas in Tulsa County. Here, numerous individuals grapple with meeting their fundamental necessities and confront a range of difficulties including limited educational attainment, elevated unemployment rates, subpar health results, and concerns related to crime.

Nevertheless, these neighborhoods also possess certain positive attributes and resources that can be utilized to enhance their circumstances and potential for the future.