Most Dangerous Neighborhoods in Norfolk County,
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Discover the 5 Most Dangerous Neighborhoods in Norfolk County, Virginia

Today, Norfolk County harbors some of the United States’ most perilous neighborhoods, characterized by elevated levels of violent and property crimes, including murder, rape, robbery, assault, burglary, theft, and motor vehicle theft.

Here, We will delve into the five most Dangerous neighborhoods in Norfolk County, Virginia, drawing from the latest crime statistics and reports. Additionally, we will examine the contributing factors to the heightened crime rates, such as poverty, unemployment, education, housing, and social issues.

History of Norfolk County

Norfolk County, Virginia, situated in South Hampton Roads in eastern Virginia, was established in 1691. It ceased to exist in 1963 following its amalgamation with the city of South Norfolk, leading to the formation of the city of Chesapeake.

Despite its dissolution, the term “Norfolk County” still denotes the region that was once within its jurisdiction, encompassing parts of Norfolk, Portsmouth, and Chesapeake.

With a lengthy and diverse history, Norfolk County has seen both prosperity and turmoil. It served as a battleground during pivotal conflicts such as the American Revolution, the War of 1812, and the Civil War.

Additionally, the county played a significant role as a prominent port and naval base, attracting both economic activity and, unfortunately, instances of crime and corruption.

NeighborhoodMedian Home ValueMedian Income
Roberts Village$121,686$9,898
Campostella$139,684$39,471
Grandy Village$126,729$19,583
Beacon Light$157,748$37,576
Coronado-Inglenook$138,472$41,375

The five most dangerous neighborhoods in Norfolk County are as follows:

Roberts Village: This neighborhood in Norfolk is considered the most dangerous, featuring the lowest median home value ($121,686) and median income ($9,898) in the city.

The violent crime rate stands at 2.52 per 1,000 residents, while the property crime rate is 17.82 per 1,000 residents. Additionally, the neighborhood has a high vacancy rate of 12.3%, well above the national average.

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Campostella: This area in Norfolk is ranked as the second most dangerous neighborhood. The median home value is $139,684, and the median income is $39,471.

Most Dangerous Neighborhoods in Norfolk County

The property crime rate is higher than 99.9% of neighborhoods in the United States. Additionally, the neighborhood has a high 28.8% rate of single-mother households, one of the highest in the country.

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Grandy Village: This neighborhood in Norfolk is ranked as the third most dangerous, with a median home value of $126,729 and a median income of $19,583. The property crime rate is higher than 99.8% of U.S. neighborhoods. Additionally, the neighborhood has a family household rate of 48.7%, which is lower than the city average.

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Beacon Light: This area in Norfolk ranks as the fourth most perilous neighborhood, featuring a median home value of $157,748 and a median income of $37,576.

Most Dangerous Neighborhoods in Norfolk County

The property crime rate exceeds that of 99.7% of U.S. neighborhoods. The community has a Hispanic or Latino population of 5.6%, surpassing the city’s average.

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Coronado-Inglenook: This neighborhood ranks as the fifth most perilous in Norfolk, featuring a median home value of $138,472 and a median income of $41,375.

While the exact violent crime rate is unavailable, its property crime rate exceeds that of 99.6% of neighborhoods in the United States. Additionally, the neighborhood has a 5.4% Asian population, surpassing the city’s average.

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To Conclude

Although Norfolk County may contain some of the United States’ most hazardous neighborhoods, it’s crucial to recognize that this complexity results from a combination of historical and socioeconomic factors.

Poverty, unemployment, education disparities, and social issues all significantly contribute to shaping crime rates. Simply categorizing these areas as “most dangerous” risks perpetuating harmful stereotypes and disregards the resilience and potential within these communities.

Tackling the root causes of crime through targeted investments in education, job creation, affordable housing, and community support programs is essential for promoting positive change and constructing a safer future for all Norfolk County residents.

By comprehending the multifaceted nature of these challenges, we can move beyond fear and strive to create a more just and flourishing society for everyone.

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With more than two years of expertise in news and analysis, Eileen Stewart is a seasoned reporter. Eileen is a respected voice in this field, well-known for her sharp reporting and insightful analysis. Her writing covers a wide range of subjects, from politics to culture and more.